StarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M

StarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M

StarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M

StarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M:at our store, we stock over 2000 models, so if you see the manufacturer, but not the model, don't be shy - give us a call and we will be happy to check! The StarTech Cable:The StarTech cable works fine, and is slightly less expensive than Apple branded. The company has a good reputation, and the cable seems well constructed. 3 meters (~9.9 foot) is about as long as is available in a copper-based Thunderbolt cable. Longer distances require specialised, and even more expensive optical fibre cables. I have used this cable as a connection in a chain of fast external drives, in connecting one Mac to another in target disk mode, and in a more rarely used function, to use one iMac as a external monitor for another. In each of these capacities the cable has been flawless.I cannot discern any difference in speed between this and the shorter Apple branded cable.More About Uses:I have two 27 inch iMac's. One is brand spanking new, and very fast. In addition to a 4 GHz i7 processor, it has a remarkable 1 TB flash drive. As a composer, using a flash drive allows me to a load samples (for example, the sounds of a string section in an orchestra) very quickly, greatly improving the overall functioning of the several software packages. My other 27 inch iMac is quite elderly and recently became cranky. It was clear to me that in addition to a small, faltering internal hard drive, that a couple other issues were causing problems. What I was happy to discover is that by attaching it via a Thunderbolt cable, I can use it as a second monitor for my newer iMac, or for my Mac laptop. it can be used as either a mirror (showing a duplicate of your primary monitor), or as additional display space. You can’t do this with a dead machine. The iMac being converted into a monitor must still be able to boot. Only after booting can it be employed in target monitor mode.This setup gives me additional screen space, and allows me to place it directly in front of my midi keyboard. the old monitor typically displays the score that I’m working on, and all the controls are placed on the other screen. Macs have incredible displays, and it seemed a shame to me to spend 00 or more( AOC Q2770PQU 27-Inch (2560x1440 Quad Resolution) LED IPS Monitor ) for a (2560x1440) monitor, when my old iMac’s screen still functioned well. It turns out that nearly all Thunderbolt equipped iMacs can be used this way. Some older iMacs models require the use of the DisplayPort rather than Thunderbolt cable to connect. There is an Apple support page about this.Of course, it’s also possible to use the Thunderbolt cable as a kind of super network connection, allowing for extremely rapid flow of data from the target machine. It can also be used conventionally to connect high-speed external devices like secondary processors and fast drives.The Expense:The only problem I have with Thunderbolt is the expense. I did some reading to find out why. The answer most frequently given has to do with licensing. It is commonly said that Apple created a high licensing fee to prevent competition. It turns out, that licensing is an issue – but not for the reasons most often given. Intel, the creator of Thunderbolt and its partner Apple, in order to prevent the production of inferior cables, require that all manufacturers using the term "Thunderbolt" purchase a license. Part of the requirement for licensure is a commitment on the part of manufacturer to assure the quality and technical specifications of the cable.If you've tried to buy a Thunderbolt cable here on Amazon, you'll find dozens of manufacturers create DisplayPort cables that are marked as "Thunderbolt compatible." if you read carefully, or if you buy one and try it, you'll find out that it is only a DisplayPort cable. The connector is the same, but the function is not. It doesn't carry data signals, it's only meant to connect monitors. Licensing is an attempt to make sure that any cable actually marked with the Thunderbolt symbol meets some very exacting technical specifications. From what I've read, this really doesn't seem to be an attempt to make money, so much as a way of preventing Thunderbolt from getting a black eye. When you read on, you'll understand why this is importantThe second reason true Thunderbolt cables are expensive is their complexity. They are not simply bundled wires with connectors at either end. In addition to wires and connectors, each cable contains a total of 12 chips plus a variety of small components, mostly resistors – all encapsulated within the plastic shroud at each end. This technology permits the formidable flow of both power and data, both at rates unavailable from any other competing type of cable. Unlike HDMI or USB, the Thunderbolt makers (which is not really a consortium, so much as a moment to moment alliance between Intel which created Thunderbolt as a proprietary technology, and Apple which early on was looking for an alternative to FireWire and slowpoke USB) wanted to develop a cable which would permit sufficient data rates as to connect virtually any type of component, be it a computer or high-speed device. In the latest versions of the Mac Pro – which is one of the fastest desktop machines available, Thunderbolt is the principle connection for external drives and components, even replacing eSATA and other short distance high-speed connection types. When this computer arrived on the market there was an almost audible intake of breath. It's a very small device, and there's no room for internal expansion. Apple relies on Thunderbolt for virtually all system expansion except memory.You don't need Thunderbolt for an inkjet. You might want it when you buy the next generation 3-D printer. At 40 Gb per second connection rates, the current generation permits copper wire, three meter connections to fast monitors and hard drives that is currently unparalleled. The next generation is going to be even more extraordinary. USB-C, has great potential. It seems that Apple, Intel and others involved in the development of Thunderbolt are going to the USB 3C connector to Thunderbolt usage. What seems very likely is that these new 3C cables are likely to be considerably more expensive than ordinary USB.selling,max 45% off,max 83% offStarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M
Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
    This fits your .
  • Make sure this fits by entering your model number.
  • Connect your Thunderbolt devices
  • Supports both Thunderbolt 1 (10Gbps) and Thunderbolt 2 (20Gbps) devices
  • Compatible with Thunderbolt equipped desktop and laptop computers such as Apple Mac Pro, Acer Aspire S5 and any laptops with Thunderbolt 2 ports
  • Also compatible with displays such as the Apple Thunderbolt Display 27", LG 34UC97 and more
  • 1m Thunderbolt Cable / 3ft Thunderbolt 2 Cable
|||

Product description

Size:3 ft / 1m  |  Color:Black

This 1m (3.28ft) Thunderbolt™ cable offers a dependable, high-quality solution for harnessing the speed and power of Thunderbolt technology while combining both data and video into a single high-performance cable. The TBOLTMM1M supports both Thunderbolt 1 (10Gbps) and Thunderbolt 2 (20Gbps) devices and can link compatible devices as part of a daisy-chained connection. Plus, with bi-directional data transfer capability and support for power delivery (for bus-powered devices), this Thunderbolt cable offers the performance needed for optimal connections. Expertly designed and constructed of only top quality material, this high performance cable is backed by StarTech..


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StarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M

StarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M:at our store, we stock over 2000 models, so if you see the manufacturer, but not the model, don't be shy - give us a call and we will be happy to check! The StarTech Cable:The StarTech cable works fine, and is slightly less expensive than Apple branded. The company has a good reputation, and the cable seems well constructed. 3 meters (~9.9 foot) is about as long as is available in a copper-based Thunderbolt cable. Longer distances require specialised, and even more expensive optical fibre cables. I have used this cable as a connection in a chain of fast external drives, in connecting one Mac to another in target disk mode, and in a more rarely used function, to use one iMac as a external monitor for another. In each of these capacities the cable has been flawless.I cannot discern any difference in speed between this and the shorter Apple branded cable.More About Uses:I have two 27 inch iMac's. One is brand spanking new, and very fast. In addition to a 4 GHz i7 processor, it has a remarkable 1 TB flash drive. As a composer, using a flash drive allows me to a load samples (for example, the sounds of a string section in an orchestra) very quickly, greatly improving the overall functioning of the several software packages. My other 27 inch iMac is quite elderly and recently became cranky. It was clear to me that in addition to a small, faltering internal hard drive, that a couple other issues were causing problems. What I was happy to discover is that by attaching it via a Thunderbolt cable, I can use it as a second monitor for my newer iMac, or for my Mac laptop. it can be used as either a mirror (showing a duplicate of your primary monitor), or as additional display space. You can’t do this with a dead machine. The iMac being converted into a monitor must still be able to boot. Only after booting can it be employed in target monitor mode.This setup gives me additional screen space, and allows me to place it directly in front of my midi keyboard. the old monitor typically displays the score that I’m working on, and all the controls are placed on the other screen. Macs have incredible displays, and it seemed a shame to me to spend 00 or more( AOC Q2770PQU 27-Inch (2560x1440 Quad Resolution) LED IPS Monitor ) for a (2560x1440) monitor, when my old iMac’s screen still functioned well. It turns out that nearly all Thunderbolt equipped iMacs can be used this way. Some older iMacs models require the use of the DisplayPort rather than Thunderbolt cable to connect. There is an Apple support page about this.Of course, it’s also possible to use the Thunderbolt cable as a kind of super network connection, allowing for extremely rapid flow of data from the target machine. It can also be used conventionally to connect high-speed external devices like secondary processors and fast drives.The Expense:The only problem I have with Thunderbolt is the expense. I did some reading to find out why. The answer most frequently given has to do with licensing. It is commonly said that Apple created a high licensing fee to prevent competition. It turns out, that licensing is an issue – but not for the reasons most often given. Intel, the creator of Thunderbolt and its partner Apple, in order to prevent the production of inferior cables, require that all manufacturers using the term "Thunderbolt" purchase a license. Part of the requirement for licensure is a commitment on the part of manufacturer to assure the quality and technical specifications of the cable.If you've tried to buy a Thunderbolt cable here on Amazon, you'll find dozens of manufacturers create DisplayPort cables that are marked as "Thunderbolt compatible." if you read carefully, or if you buy one and try it, you'll find out that it is only a DisplayPort cable. The connector is the same, but the function is not. It doesn't carry data signals, it's only meant to connect monitors. Licensing is an attempt to make sure that any cable actually marked with the Thunderbolt symbol meets some very exacting technical specifications. From what I've read, this really doesn't seem to be an attempt to make money, so much as a way of preventing Thunderbolt from getting a black eye. When you read on, you'll understand why this is importantThe second reason true Thunderbolt cables are expensive is their complexity. They are not simply bundled wires with connectors at either end. In addition to wires and connectors, each cable contains a total of 12 chips plus a variety of small components, mostly resistors – all encapsulated within the plastic shroud at each end. This technology permits the formidable flow of both power and data, both at rates unavailable from any other competing type of cable. Unlike HDMI or USB, the Thunderbolt makers (which is not really a consortium, so much as a moment to moment alliance between Intel which created Thunderbolt as a proprietary technology, and Apple which early on was looking for an alternative to FireWire and slowpoke USB) wanted to develop a cable which would permit sufficient data rates as to connect virtually any type of component, be it a computer or high-speed device. In the latest versions of the Mac Pro – which is one of the fastest desktop machines available, Thunderbolt is the principle connection for external drives and components, even replacing eSATA and other short distance high-speed connection types. When this computer arrived on the market there was an almost audible intake of breath. It's a very small device, and there's no room for internal expansion. Apple relies on Thunderbolt for virtually all system expansion except memory.You don't need Thunderbolt for an inkjet. You might want it when you buy the next generation 3-D printer. At 40 Gb per second connection rates, the current generation permits copper wire, three meter connections to fast monitors and hard drives that is currently unparalleled. The next generation is going to be even more extraordinary. USB-C, has great potential. It seems that Apple, Intel and others involved in the development of Thunderbolt are going to the USB 3C connector to Thunderbolt usage. What seems very likely is that these new 3C cables are likely to be considerably more expensive than ordinary USB.selling,max 45% off,max 83% offStarTech.com 15cm 6in Short Slim USB 3.0 A to Micro B Cable M/M