Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection

Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection

Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection

Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection:at our store, we stock over 2000 models, so if you see the manufacturer, but not the model, don't be shy - give us a call and we will be happy to check! As a fan of the original crew, I'm grateful to have all their movies together in one pack. Not all of them were good, but they were what they were. For those of you who don't know:The Motion Picture- Probably not the best place to start for the uninitiated. The special effects were excellent for 1979, and we got to see the new "refit" of the original Enterprise (which is my favorite version of the ship), but that's about all there is to rave about. It was directed by someone who was not a fan of the original series- he didn't "get" what Star Trek was all about, so he made a special effects movie with a thin story and FAR too little action. Sure, watch it, but watch the good ones first. This one is not really important to the overall story.The Wrath of Khan- often regarded as the best of the bunch- probably should start with this one. This one brings to the table an old enemy of Kirk's from an episode of the original series, an early (although short) example of computer animation, and Kirk's son who nobody knew about (except Kirk and his ex). The showdown between the Enterprise and the Reliant may not be nearly as flashy as, well, pretty much any similar scene made today, but it is very suspenseful and leads to (what was at the time) a shocking and sad ending.The Search for Spock- my personal favorite. Way better than what most people think. It continues the story started in The Wrath of Khan.The Voyage Home- the one with the whales, also a good one. This one has a much more lighthearted and almost comedic feel to it, supposedly to offset the darkness of the two previous films. Spock even learns to cuss in this one, which is hilarious given his deadpan delivery.The Final Frontier- not one of the better ones. This one was done on a smaller budget, and it shows. It doesn't really continue the story arc of the three previous ones. There are a few parts here and there which keep it from being a total loss. The characters on The Big Bang Theory once debated whether this movie or the first Star Trek movie was the one against which all things that suck should be judged, or something like that.The Undiscovered Country- much better than the one before it. This one brings a fitting end to the story of the original Enterprise crew. I remember hearing at the time (1991) that this one would bridge the gap to The Next Generation, but it didn't. Michael Dorn (Worf) played a Klingon lawyer who defended Kirk and McCoy, and it was said that his character was Worf's grandfather, but no reference was made to that in the movie, so nobody who saw the interview in which that was revealed would have known. Anyway, this one had some cool computer effects such as floating zero-gravity Klingon blood as well as morphing- David Bowie's wife Iman plays a shapeshifter- that looked great. Maybe they should have skipped the 5th movie and gone straight to this one.The gap to The Next Generation didn't get filled until the next movie (Generations), which was very boring in my opinion. I'll always love the original Enterprise crew over the ones who came after, or before. If you agree, or if you're new to the whole Star Trek experience, then get these movies! Of course, you should watch all of the original series first...tucson mall,fort worth mall,quality inspectionStar Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection
Identification, Images, & Information
For Insects, Spiders & Their Kin
For the United States & Canada
|||

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Prepare to boldly go where no man has gone before with the Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection, an action-packed box set featuring the six films in their original theatrical versions starring the U.S.S. Enterprise's legendary crew. The films have been digitally remastered and The Wrath of Khan has been fully restored in high definition with brilliant picture quality and 7.1 Dolby TrueHD. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan (1982) Star Trek: The Search for Spock (1984) Star Trek: The Voyage Home (1986) Star Trek: The Final Frontier (1989) Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country (1991)

"h3"Amazon.com "p""strong"Star Trek I : The Original Motion Picture"br"Back when the first "em"Star Trek feature was released in December 1979, the "em"Trek franchise was still relatively modest, consisting of the original TV series, an animated cartoon series from 1973-74, and a burgeoning fan network around the world. Series creator Gene Roddenberry had conceived a second TV series, but after the success of "em"Star Wars the project was upgraded into this lavish feature film, which reunited the original series cast aboard a beautifully redesigned starship U.S.S. "em"Enterprise. Under the direction of Robert Wise (best known for "em"West Side Story), the film proved to be a mixed blessing for "em"Trek fans, who heatedly debated its merits; but it was, of course, a phenomenal hit. Capt. Kirk (William Shatner) leads his crew into the vast structures surrounding V'Ger, an all-powerful being that is cutting a destructive course through Starfleet space. With his new First Officer (Stephen Collins), the bald and beautiful Lieutenant Ilia (played by the late Persis Khambatta) and his returning veteran crew, Kirk must decipher the secret of V'Ger's true purpose and restore the safety of the galaxy. The story is rather overblown and derivative of plots from the original series, and avid Trekkies greeted the film's bland costumes with derisive laughter. But as a feast for the eyes, this is an adventure worthy of big-screen trekkin'. Douglas Trumbull's visual effects are astonishing, and Jerry Goldmith's score is regarded as one of the prolific composer's very best (with its main theme later used for Star Trek: The Next Generation). And, fortunately for Star Trek fans, the expanded 143-minute version (originally shown for the film's network TV premiere) is generally considered an improvement over the original theatrical release. "em"--Jeff Shannon"br""br""strong"Star Trek II :"strong"The Wrath of Khan"br"Although "em"Star Trek: The Motion Picture had been a box-office hit, it was by no means a unanimous success with "em"Star Trek fans, who responded much more favorably to the "classic "em"Trek" scenario of "em"Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. Inspired by the "Space Seed" episode of the original TV series, the film reunites newly promoted Admiral Kirk with his nemesis from the earlier episode--the genetically superior Khan (Ricardo Montalban)--who is now seeking revenge upon Kirk for having been imprisoned on a desolated planet. Their battle ensues over control of the Genesis device, a top-secret Starfleet project enabling entire planets to be transformed into life-supporting worlds, pioneered by the mother (Bibi Besch) of Kirk's estranged and now-adult son. While Mr. Spock mentors the young Vulcan Lt. Saavik (then-newcomer Kirstie Alley), Kirk must battle Khan to the bitter end, through a climactic starship chase and an unexpected crisis that will cost the life of Kirk's closest friend. This was the kind of character-based Trek that fans were waiting for, boosted by spectacular special effects, a great villain (thanks to Montalban's splendidly melodramatic performance), and a deft combination of humor, excitement, and wondrous imagination. Director Nicholas Meyer (who would play a substantial role in the success of future "em"Trek features) handles the film as a combination of "em"Moby Dick, Shakespearean tragedy, World War II submarine thriller, and dazzling science fiction, setting the successful tone for the "em"Trek films that followed. "em"--Jeff Shannon"br""br""strong"Star Trek III : "strong"The Search for Spock "br"You didn't think Mr. Spock was really dead, did you? When Spock's casket landed on the surface of the Genesis planet at the end of "em"Star Trek II, we had already been told that Genesis had the power to bring "life from lifelessness." So it's no surprise that this energetic but somewhat hokey sequel gives Spock a new lease on life, beginning with his rebirth and rapid growth as the Genesis planet literally shakes itself apart in a series of tumultuous geological spasms. As Kirk is getting to know his estranged son (Merritt Butrick), he must also do battle with the fiendish Klingon Kruge (Christopher Lloyd), who is determined to seize the power of Genesis from the Federation. Meanwhile, the regenerated Spock returns to his home planet, and Star Trek III gains considerable interest by exploring the ceremonial (and, of course, highly logical) traditions of Vulcan society. The movie's a minor disappointment compared to "em"Star Trek II, but it's a--well, logical--sequel that successfully restores Spock (and first-time film director Leonard Nimoy) to the phenomenal Trek franchise...as if he were ever really gone. With Kirk's willful destruction of the U.S.S. "em"Enterprise and Robin Curtis replacing the departing Kirstie Alley as Vulcan Lt. Saavik, this was clearly a transitional film in the series, clearing the way for the highly popular "em"Star Trek IV. "em"--Jeff Shannon"br""br""strong"Star Trek IV :"strong" The Voyage Home "br"Jumping on to the end-of-the-century bandwagon a little early, Paramount Pictures released 10 of their top films in one 10-pack, the Millennium Collection, in 1998. All the films are presented in their widescreen editions; one, "em"Breakfast at Tiffany's, is offered in this format for the first time. The set includes 5 Best Picture Oscar winners and films that took home an additional 33 Academy Awards. All the tapes are available to buy individually. The pack, with a handsome mosaic of faces from the movies, also features collector gift cards (a movie version of baseball cards) and a commemorative booklet detailing the productions of all 10 films. The collection is oddly weighted toward the last 25 years, offering only one film from the 1950s and one from the 1960s. Your taste in current cinema will define the value of the set. Besides Tiffany's, one of Audrey Hepburn's finest films, the collection contains: The Ten Commandments with Charlton Heston, Grease with John Travolta, Francis Ford Coppola's "em"Apocalypse Now and "em"The Godfather, the funny, whale-saving "em"Star Trek IV--The Voyage Home, Tom Cruise's hit Top Gun, the smash hit Ghost with Demi Moore, Mel Gibson's Celt fest "em"Braveheart, and "em"Forrest Gump with Tom Hanks. "em"--Doug Thomas"br""br""strong"Star Trek V :"strong"The Final Frontier"br"Movie critic Roger Ebert summed it up very succinctly: "Of all of the "em"Star Trek movies, this is the worst." Subsequent films in the popular series have done nothing to disprove this opinion; we can be grateful that they've all been significantly better since this film was released in 1989. After Leonard Nimoy scored hits with Star Trek III and IV, William Shatner used his contractual clout (and bruised ego) to assume directorial duties on this mission, in which a rebellious Vulcan (Laurence Luckinbill) kidnaps Federation officials in his overzealous quest for the supreme source of creation. That's right, you heard it correctly: "em"Star Trek V is about a crazy Vulcan's search for God. By the time Kirk, Spock, and their Federation cohorts are taken to the Great Barrier of the galaxy, this journey to "the final future" has gone from an embarrassing prologue to an absurd conclusion, with a lot of creaky plotting in between. Of course, die-hard Trekkies will still allow this movie into their video collections; but they'll only watch it when nobody else is looking. After this humbling experience, Shatner wisely relinquished the director's chair to Star Trek II's Nicholas Meyer. "em"--Jeff Shannon"br""br""strong"Star Trek VI :"strong" The Undiscovered Country"br""em"Star Trek V left us nowhere to go but up, and with the return of "em"Star Trek II director Nicholas Meyer, "em"Star Trek VI restored the movie series to its classic blend of space opera, intelligent plotting, and engaging interaction of stalwart heroes and menacing villains. Borrowing its subtitle (and several lines of dialogue) from Shakespeare, the movie finds Admiral Kirk (William Shatner) and his fellow "em"Enterprise crew members on a diplomatic mission to negotiate peace with the revered Klingon Chancellor Gorkon (David Warner). When the high-ranking Klingon and several officers are ruthlessly murdered, blame is placed on Kirk, whose subsequent investigation uncovers an assassination plot masterminded by the nefarious Klingon General Chang (Christopher Plummer) in an effort to disrupt a historic peace summit. As this political plot unfolds, "em"Star Trek VI takes on a sharp-edged tone, with Kirk and Spock confronting their opposing views of diplomacy, and testing their bonds of loyalty when a Vulcan officer is revealed to be a traitor. With a dramatic depth befitting what was to be the final movie mission of the original "em"Star Trek crew, this film took the veteran cast out in respectably high style. With the torch being passed to the crew of "em"Star Trek: The Next Generation, only Kirk, Scotty, and Chekov would return, however briefly, in "em"Star Trek: Generations. "em"--Jeff Shannon"br""br"

Clickable Guide
Moths Butterflies Flies Caterpillars Flies Dragonflies Flies Mantids Cockroaches Bees and Wasps Walkingsticks Earwigs Ants Termites Hoppers and Kin Hoppers and Kin Beetles True Bugs Fleas Grasshoppers and Kin Ticks Spiders Scorpions Centipedes Millipedes

Calendar
Upcoming Events

BugGuide is a National Moth Week Partner. How to add your National Moth Week 2021 photos. July 17-25.

Photos of insects and people from the Spring 2021 gathering in Louisiana, April 28-May 2

National Moth Week 2020 photos of insects and people.

Photos of insects and people from the 2019 BugGuide Gathering in Louisiana, July 25-27

Discussion, insects and people from the 2018 gathering in Virginia, July 27-29

Photos of insects and people from the 2015 gathering in Wisconsin, July 10-12

Photos of insects and people from the 2014 gathering in Virginia, June 4-7.

Photos of insects and people from the 2013 gathering in Arizona, July 25-28

Previous events


Ghirardelli Intense Dark Premium Dark Chocolate Assortment 15 OzSuper Strap Super SheetGOSEN Polylon Comfort Series (Five-Petals Structured Polyester sNew Brass Air Compressor In Tank Check Valve 1/2" Male X 1/2" Feddrum Red Shot 5-Piece Drum Trigger KitImpecGear mens BaseballInfliktedBlack and Decker LED3FOLD-BLK 5W LED Desk Lamp with USB Charging
Edward Tools Harden Forged One Piece Steel Claw Hammer 16 oz - PPersonalized Mouse Pad with Picture Photo Text, Customized MouseSheer Curtains Floral Embroidery Blue 84 Inch Long Rod Pocket LaIrish Pride Leprechaun Nutcracker with Pot of Gold and FlagFine Shouldered Deep Toggle Switch Nut Gold Finish For SwitchcraSubaru OEM Automatic Transmission Fluid (ATF) (Pack of 12)Whimsical Gifts Math Teacher Watch in Silver in Large StyleMAD SHARK Chef Knife Pro Kitchen Knife 7.5 inch Cooking Knife Gl

Welcome to BugGuide.Net!

Photo © Joyce Gross

All Abuzz About Bugs!

We are an online community of naturalists who enjoy learning about and sharing our observations of insects, spiders, and other related creatures.

We enjoy the opportunity to instill in others the fascination and appreciation that we share for the intricate lives of these oft-maligned creatures.

Our Mission

Using the best resources we have access to, we are creating a knowledgebase to help each other and the online community.

Our Method

We collect photographs of bugs from the United States and Canada for identification and research.

We summarize our findings in guide pages for each order, family, genus, and species.

Making New Discoveries

More than just a clearinghouse for information, this site helps expand on the natural histories of our subjects. By capturing the place and time that submitted images were taken, we are creating a virtual collection that helps define where and when things might be found.

We capture never-before-seen behaviors and we have photos of species that you won't find anywhere else on the web.

Join us!

Placed by Robert H. Biagi 19 minutes ago in

Placed by Robert H. Biagi 28 minutes ago in

Placed by Robert H. Biagi 31 minutes ago in

Placed by Robert H. Biagi 33 minutes ago in

Placed by Robert H. Biagi 44 minutes ago in

Placed by Robert H. Biagi 58 minutes ago in




Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection

Star Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection:at our store, we stock over 2000 models, so if you see the manufacturer, but not the model, don't be shy - give us a call and we will be happy to check! As a fan of the original crew, I'm grateful to have all their movies together in one pack. Not all of them were good, but they were what they were. For those of you who don't know:The Motion Picture- Probably not the best place to start for the uninitiated. The special effects were excellent for 1979, and we got to see the new "refit" of the original Enterprise (which is my favorite version of the ship), but that's about all there is to rave about. It was directed by someone who was not a fan of the original series- he didn't "get" what Star Trek was all about, so he made a special effects movie with a thin story and FAR too little action. Sure, watch it, but watch the good ones first. This one is not really important to the overall story.The Wrath of Khan- often regarded as the best of the bunch- probably should start with this one. This one brings to the table an old enemy of Kirk's from an episode of the original series, an early (although short) example of computer animation, and Kirk's son who nobody knew about (except Kirk and his ex). The showdown between the Enterprise and the Reliant may not be nearly as flashy as, well, pretty much any similar scene made today, but it is very suspenseful and leads to (what was at the time) a shocking and sad ending.The Search for Spock- my personal favorite. Way better than what most people think. It continues the story started in The Wrath of Khan.The Voyage Home- the one with the whales, also a good one. This one has a much more lighthearted and almost comedic feel to it, supposedly to offset the darkness of the two previous films. Spock even learns to cuss in this one, which is hilarious given his deadpan delivery.The Final Frontier- not one of the better ones. This one was done on a smaller budget, and it shows. It doesn't really continue the story arc of the three previous ones. There are a few parts here and there which keep it from being a total loss. The characters on The Big Bang Theory once debated whether this movie or the first Star Trek movie was the one against which all things that suck should be judged, or something like that.The Undiscovered Country- much better than the one before it. This one brings a fitting end to the story of the original Enterprise crew. I remember hearing at the time (1991) that this one would bridge the gap to The Next Generation, but it didn't. Michael Dorn (Worf) played a Klingon lawyer who defended Kirk and McCoy, and it was said that his character was Worf's grandfather, but no reference was made to that in the movie, so nobody who saw the interview in which that was revealed would have known. Anyway, this one had some cool computer effects such as floating zero-gravity Klingon blood as well as morphing- David Bowie's wife Iman plays a shapeshifter- that looked great. Maybe they should have skipped the 5th movie and gone straight to this one.The gap to The Next Generation didn't get filled until the next movie (Generations), which was very boring in my opinion. I'll always love the original Enterprise crew over the ones who came after, or before. If you agree, or if you're new to the whole Star Trek experience, then get these movies! Of course, you should watch all of the original series first...tucson mall,fort worth mall,quality inspectionStar Trek: Original Motion Picture Collection